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LPC (prep and legacy notes)

Lisa Lowe

Distinguished Member
Nov 26, 2019
74
40
Hello,

I was just wondering if anyone has any practical tips or recommended resources for those starting the LPC?

I've searched the forums on here and key tip seems to be to just keep on top of the work load. I've also read people discussing 'legacy notes'; do people tend to buy these for every module and is there a standard/recommended provider to purchase these from?

Any general LPC advice is appreciated! :)
 

OH

Star Member
Future Trainee
Nov 24, 2018
43
231
Hi,

I just finished the LPC and ended with very high distinctions in everything.

Assuming it's still online exams, I would buy the legacy notes as for 90% of the exams I just copied them word for word, with the other 10% being annotations that I'd added in during the tutorials. Everyone in my group used https://lawanswered.com/lpc but I am sure there are others too.

Even if it's not online, then I'd still buy the core modules one as I found the answer plans very useful for understanding parts that were poorly explained by BPP.

Having said that, at the end of each tutorial, at BPP, you received model answers which were almost identical to the actual exam. For example, in accounts this year, the past paper was exactly the same format with slightly different numbers so you could copy it almost entirely. So you could just print all of them instead/learn them if it's not open book anymore.
 

Lisa Lowe

Distinguished Member
Nov 26, 2019
74
40
Hi,

I just finished the LPC and ended with very high distinctions in everything.

Assuming it's still online exams, I would buy the legacy notes as for 90% of the exams I just copied them word for word, with the other 10% being annotations that I'd added in during the tutorials. Everyone in my group used https://lawanswered.com/lpc but I am sure there are others too.

Even if it's not online, then I'd still buy the core modules one as I found the answer plans very useful for understanding parts that were poorly explained by BPP.

Having said that, at the end of each tutorial, at BPP, you received model answers which were almost identical to the actual exam. For example, in accounts this year, the past paper was exactly the same format with slightly different numbers so you could copy it almost entirely. So you could just print all of them instead/learn them if it's not open book anymore.
Congrats on your LPC grade! and thanks for the link to the legacy notes you all used!

Do you have any tips for doing the LPC? Also, do you mind me asking how difficult you found it and how you managed the workload?
 

OH

Star Member
Future Trainee
Nov 24, 2018
43
231
Re tips, if it's closed book then memorise everything as you go along (i.e. relevant cases, which tabs in your statute books are for what, stock phrases you've been told to use for marks), as once you fall behind in the core modules it would be very difficult to catch up easily. If it's open book then focus on tabbing everything as you go along, I went 'into' the exam with every solution/handout/the legacy notes tabbed and highlighted so there was no question I couldn't immediately locate the answer to in <30 seconds.

For me personally, no content was conceptually difficult. The hard part is rote learning lots of information, but given it was open book that difficulty was removed. I initially spent 4 days a week on it (sat/sun prepping and then mon/tue doing the tutorials, rest doing tc applications) but after the first 3 weeks I realised the handouts/notes had everything so I just turned up to the tutorials on mon/tue with no prep and then added any extra information given to the legacy notes. One of the perks of it being online was that I also could attend none of the electives teaching live and instead took 3/5 teaching weeks off, watched most of the lectures back to back in week 4, did the past papers casually in week 5 + last few lectures, then took the exams. The skills are ticking boxes, just do exactly what they tell you to do and you'll score near full marks.