GDL/LPC/SQE self-funding advice wanted!

chllsmth96

New Member
  • Jun 20, 2021
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    Hi all,

    Bit of background - I'm 25 and have an undergrad and masters in Eng lit from a RG university and have been working full-time in a non-legal role since graduating in 2019. Intention has always been to convert to law and I've decided now is my time but I'm in a conundrum about how best to move forward.

    The ultimate goal is to secure a training contract and work as a solicitor in a c. top 20 firm.

    I have an offer from ULaw to study the GDL full-time from Sept 21 (self-funding w/ savings) but don't have enough money to continue straight onto the LPC and complete the 'old' qualification route. From Sept 21, I'll be applying for TCs starting in 2024 but reading TCLA forums the general consensus seems to be firms will make a hard switch to SQE for 2024 intakes.

    If that is the case, and given I can't afford the LPC unless I secure funding from a firm who'll take me on earlier than 2024, should I just delay and take a PGDL course starting Jan 2022 or decline my place and continue working while applying for TCs from September?

    I understand the PGDL is not a requirement under the new SQE route but I have read candidates who'd completed the GDL faired better in SQE trials. I assume the GDL/PGDL would also give me a leg into other legal roles/relevant legal work experience should I not be successful in securing a 2024 TC.

    @Jessica Booker any guidance or words of wisdom would be hugely appreciated

    Many thanks
     

    Jessica Booker

    Legendary Member
    Graduate Recruitment
    Premium Member
    Forum Team
    Aug 1, 2019
    6,267
    8,882
    Hi all,

    Bit of background - I'm 25 and have an undergrad and masters in Eng lit from a RG university and have been working full-time in a non-legal role since graduating in 2019. Intention has always been to convert to law and I've decided now is my time but I'm in a conundrum about how best to move forward.

    The ultimate goal is to secure a training contract and work as a solicitor in a c. top 20 firm.

    I have an offer from ULaw to study the GDL full-time from Sept 21 (self-funding w/ savings) but don't have enough money to continue straight onto the LPC and complete the 'old' qualification route. From Sept 21, I'll be applying for TCs starting in 2024 but reading TCLA forums the general consensus seems to be firms will make a hard switch to SQE for 2024 intakes.

    If that is the case, and given I can't afford the LPC unless I secure funding from a firm who'll take me on earlier than 2024, should I just delay and take a PGDL course starting Jan 2022 or decline my place and continue working while applying for TCs from September?

    I understand the PGDL is not a requirement under the new SQE route but I have read candidates who'd completed the GDL faired better in SQE trials. I assume the GDL/PGDL would also give me a leg into other legal roles/relevant legal work experience should I not be successful in securing a 2024 TC.

    @Jessica Booker any guidance or words of wisdom would be hugely appreciated

    Many thanks

    People who have completed the GDL will fair better in the SQE trials, as apart from self-teaching yourself law for a trial, there wouldn’t really be a direct alternative - at the moment you can pretty much only gain your legal knowledge for the SQE through the GDL. That will change once the SQE is in place - there will be many alternatives to the GDL.

    This is a really tricky situation. This September’s intake for the GDL will be the last one for which you can take the existing qualification route, which makes the decision a bit more “definite”. Normally I would easily say wait it out and wait to secure a TC and get sponsorship, but it’s not such a clear decision.

    I think it’s really a case of weighing up the opportunity cost of the GDL. To some people the money spent on the course will ultimately cost a lot less than the next person who is paying the same fee. To me, I’d have various important things I could spend the £££££ on and so to me the opportunity cost is much higher than someone who hasn’t got anything immediately important to spend the money on.