Should I link my answer here back to the law firm?

Darth Vader

Active Member
Dec 19, 2021
11
13
I'm currently answering the question 'At RPC we work in a collaborative, forward thinking environment. Provide an example when you have demonstrated your ability to collaborate or have shown yourself to be forward thinking. You may want to make references to your hobbies, interests and/or work experience to illustrate your answer' (300 words).

I've got three examples that will take up 100 words each. My approach is to outline how I was 'collaborative' or 'forward thinking' by outlining a scenario, describing how I tackled it and explaining my thought-process in detail. I'm trying to follow the 'show don't tell' approach.

I'm wondering if RPC wants me to add the extra step of linking how my experience relates to working for them? I'm worried about doing this because the question doesn't ask this of me, so I'm assuming the recruiters just want me to discuss my experiences and then they can judge for themselves if I come across as someone who meets their 'collaborative' and 'forward thinking' values.

Side question: do I say 'as Events Manager for x' or 'as events manager for x', I'm not sure if capitalisation of my post gets points deducted for grammar.
 

Jessica Booker

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Aug 1, 2019
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I'm currently answering the question 'At RPC we work in a collaborative, forward thinking environment. Provide an example when you have demonstrated your ability to collaborate or have shown yourself to be forward thinking. You may want to make references to your hobbies, interests and/or work experience to illustrate your answer' (300 words).

I've got three examples that will take up 100 words each. My approach is to outline how I was 'collaborative' or 'forward thinking' by outlining a scenario, describing how I tackled it and explaining my thought-process in detail. I'm trying to follow the 'show don't tell' approach.

I'm wondering if RPC wants me to add the extra step of linking how my experience relates to working for them? I'm worried about doing this because the question doesn't ask this of me, so I'm assuming the recruiters just want me to discuss my experiences and then they can judge for themselves if I come across as someone who meets their 'collaborative' and 'forward thinking' values.

Side question: do I say 'as Events Manager for x' or 'as events manager for x', I'm not sure if capitalisation of my post gets points deducted for grammar.
There is no need to link it to the firm as they have done this in the question itself.

In that example, it would be events manager but it is highly unlikely you would be scored down in anyway if you wrote Events Manager.
 
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George Maxwell

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I'm currently answering the question 'At RPC we work in a collaborative, forward thinking environment. Provide an example when you have demonstrated your ability to collaborate or have shown yourself to be forward thinking. You may want to make references to your hobbies, interests and/or work experience to illustrate your answer' (300 words).

I've got three examples that will take up 100 words each. My approach is to outline how I was 'collaborative' or 'forward thinking' by outlining a scenario, describing how I tackled it and explaining my thought-process in detail. I'm trying to follow the 'show don't tell' approach.

I'm wondering if RPC wants me to add the extra step of linking how my experience relates to working for them? I'm worried about doing this because the question doesn't ask this of me, so I'm assuming the recruiters just want me to discuss my experiences and then they can judge for themselves if I come across as someone who meets their 'collaborative' and 'forward thinking' values.

Side question: do I say 'as Events Manager for x' or 'as events manager for x', I'm not sure if capitalisation of my post gets points deducted for grammar.
Hi @Darth Vader,

Welcome to the forum! 🚀

Tagging @James Carrabino who has significant experience reviewing applications for his perspective.

I would say that three examples in a 300 word answer is too many. I would have struggled to go into the required depth and development of each example in 100 words. So my first piece of advice is think about reducing the number of examples you are including.

I would also caution you that by using multiple examples you are technically going beyond what the question is asking. From what you have said, the question wants you to provide "an example". Personally I would have just stuck to one if when I was applying because this might suggest that the firm wants a single thoroughly developed example.

With regards to linking to the firm, I often did do this in my answers, even if the question did not explicitly ask for it. This is a personal choice though and as @Jessica Booker says, this is already contained within the question. If you were to do this make sure it is a non-generic link (i.e., it adds very little to say something along the lines of "this ability to work in a team would be useful when I become a trainee at the firm". A link needs to be specific to really add something.

Hope that helps and as always please do ask any follow-ups if anything I have written is unclear 😊
 

Darth Vader

Active Member
Dec 19, 2021
11
13
Hi @Darth Vader,

Welcome to the forum! 🚀

Tagging @James Carrabino who has significant experience reviewing applications for his perspective.

I would say that three examples in a 300 word answer is too many. I would have struggled to go into the required depth and development of each example in 100 words. So my first piece of advice is think about reducing the number of examples you are including.

I would also caution you that by using multiple examples you are technically going beyond what the question is asking. From what you have said, the question wants you to provide "an example". Personally I would have just stuck to one if when I was applying because this might suggest that the firm wants a single thoroughly developed example.

With regards to linking to the firm, I often did do this in my answers, even if the question did not explicitly ask for it. This is a personal choice though and as @Jessica Booker says, this is already contained within the question. If you were to do this make sure it is a non-generic link (i.e., it adds very little to say something along the lines of "this ability to work in a team would be useful when I become a trainee at the firm". A link needs to be specific to really add something.

Hope that helps and as always please do ask any follow-ups if anything I have written is unclear 😊
Thank you for the warm welcome George. I thought about what you said with me going beyond what the question is asking and I think you're right. I've now picked a single example that I have a lot to say about. Thanks for your help!
 
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James Carrabino

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I'm currently answering the question 'At RPC we work in a collaborative, forward thinking environment. Provide an example when you have demonstrated your ability to collaborate or have shown yourself to be forward thinking. You may want to make references to your hobbies, interests and/or work experience to illustrate your answer' (300 words).

I've got three examples that will take up 100 words each. My approach is to outline how I was 'collaborative' or 'forward thinking' by outlining a scenario, describing how I tackled it and explaining my thought-process in detail. I'm trying to follow the 'show don't tell' approach.

I'm wondering if RPC wants me to add the extra step of linking how my experience relates to working for them? I'm worried about doing this because the question doesn't ask this of me, so I'm assuming the recruiters just want me to discuss my experiences and then they can judge for themselves if I come across as someone who meets their 'collaborative' and 'forward thinking' values.

Side question: do I say 'as Events Manager for x' or 'as events manager for x', I'm not sure if capitalisation of my post gets points deducted for grammar.
There is no need to link it to the firm as they have done this in the question itself.

In that example, it would be events manager but it is highly unlikely you would be scored down in anyway if you wrote Events Manager.
Hi @Darth Vader,

Welcome to the forum! 🚀

Tagging @James Carrabino who has significant experience reviewing applications for his perspective.

I would say that three examples in a 300 word answer is too many. I would have struggled to go into the required depth and development of each example in 100 words. So my first piece of advice is think about reducing the number of examples you are including.

I would also caution you that by using multiple examples you are technically going beyond what the question is asking. From what you have said, the question wants you to provide "an example". Personally I would have just stuck to one if when I was applying because this might suggest that the firm wants a single thoroughly developed example.

With regards to linking to the firm, I often did do this in my answers, even if the question did not explicitly ask for it. This is a personal choice though and as @Jessica Booker says, this is already contained within the question. If you were to do this make sure it is a non-generic link (i.e., it adds very little to say something along the lines of "this ability to work in a team would be useful when I become a trainee at the firm". A link needs to be specific to really add something.

Hope that helps and as always please do ask any follow-ups if anything I have written is unclear 😊
Thanks @George Maxwell for tagging me!

I agree with @Jessica Booker that there is no need to link it to the firm. If something really jumps out to you as relating to a specific area of work you would be doing, then feel free to mention it. This should be a sentence or two short sentences at most.

Also agreed that 'events manager' is generic enough not to be capitalised. If your formal title is 'Events Manager' then it would be okay to use that as well. If you say 'the events manager' then it cannot be 'the Events Manager' because you are not using it as a title but as a job description - do you see the difference? Either way, you are unlikely to be marked down for this as @Jessica Booker said.

I am glad to see you have taken @George Maxwell's advice and limited your answer to a single example. In general I would not necessarily say that three examples is too much for 300 words depending on context, but here the question is very specific about wanting only a single example.

Basically, do exactly (and only) what the question asks of you and you can never go wrong!

Hope that helps :)
 

Darth Vader

Active Member
Dec 19, 2021
11
13
Thanks @George Maxwell for tagging me!

I agree with @Jessica Booker that there is no need to link it to the firm. If something really jumps out to you as relating to a specific area of work you would be doing, then feel free to mention it. This should be a sentence or two short sentences at most.

Also agreed that 'events manager' is generic enough not to be capitalised. If your formal title is 'Events Manager' then it would be okay to use that as well. If you say 'the events manager' then it cannot be 'the Events Manager' because you are not using it as a title but as a job description - do you see the difference? Either way, you are unlikely to be marked down for this as @Jessica Booker said.

I am glad to see you have taken @George Maxwell's advice and limited your answer to a single example. In general I would not necessarily say that three examples is too much for 300 words depending on context, but here the question is very specific about wanting only a single example.

Basically, do exactly (and only) what the question asks of you and you can never go wrong!

Hope that helps :)
It does help, thanks!
 

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