TCLA General Discussion Thread 2021-22 (#1)

wolvesckm

Active Member
May 28, 2021
12
2
I’d say private practice would be better as you are more likely to be working with clients directly. But I don’t think the decision is as simple as that - the public sector role could be far more complex/more responsibilities and therefore could develop your skill set more. I think you also need to factor in what job you would enjoy the most too. Doing a job for a longer term goal of getting a TC is probably not the most enjoyable way of doing things, and I strongly recommend people do what they would enjoy, even if it is not a long term aim.
I completely agree, it's quite a difficult decision to make! I liked all 3 firms tbh
 

G P

Star Member
Jul 13, 2020
44
120
Hi folks,
I wonder if anyone could help reassure me. I have my first ever in-person interview for a TC tomorrow. Whilst I feel the most prepared I've ever been for an interview, I still feel like there is so much I just don't know! I keep panicking that I need to read up on this and that but also think that if I don't know it now, then I won't in time for tomorrow. As someone with no prior legal work experience and a non-law student, I suppose I feel as though I'm not knowledgeable enough to be there. I also worry that I'll get a question I just can't answer, and that I'll freeze and embarrass myself.
Has anyone ever felt the same way?
All the best and many thanks,
G
 

Jessica Booker

Legendary Member
Graduate Recruitment
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Forum Team
Aug 1, 2019
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Hi folks,
I wonder if anyone could help reassure me. I have my first ever in-person interview for a TC tomorrow. Whilst I feel the most prepared I've ever been for an interview, I still feel like there is so much I just don't know! I keep panicking that I need to read up on this and that but also think that if I don't know it now, then I won't in time for tomorrow. As someone with no prior legal work experience and a non-law student, I suppose I feel as though I'm not knowledgeable enough to be there. I also worry that I'll get a question I just can't answer, and that I'll freeze and embarrass myself.
Has anyone ever felt the same way?
All the best and many thanks,
G
As a lawyer you will never be expected to know everything off the top of your head, and therefore you won’t be expected to in an interview either.

You were brought through to interview with the firm knowing you are a non-law applicant and also that you have no legal work experience - they clearly saw enough strengths in your application to want to see you and that doesn’t always come down to technical legal knowledge. This is especially the case when the legal knowledge will be taught through law school and through the training contract itself.

They really just want to see you have analytical ability and an interest in the topic - not that you can get things right, but that you have the tools to make the right decisions in the future under their guidance.

I’d say 90% of interviewees have these thoughts on some level prior to an interview. Those that don’t have the potential to be over confident or ultimately probably don’t care enough.

People do freeze in interviews but rarely embarrass themselves when they do. If you do freeze, here are some tactics to use:

- Ask for a moment to think about the question and what your answer will be

- Ask them to repeat the question again

- Take a sip of water

- Ask the interviewer for more context (if appropriate)

- Ask if you could come back to that question later on in the interview

Always try and give the answer a go, but it isn’t the end of the world if you explain you are not sure of the answer but based on your understanding you think this is the right answer. Interviewers tend to guide you a little when you are off track.

And even if you do really freeze and can’t answer one question - it is just one question of many you will be asked. Your interviewer might be able to get what they are looking for from other questions they ask you.
 
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G P

Star Member
Jul 13, 2020
44
120
As a lawyer you will never be expected to know everything off the top of your head, and therefore you won’t be expected to in an interview either.

You were brought through to interview with the firm knowing you are a non-law applicant and also that you have no legal work experience - they clearly saw enough strengths in your application to want to see you and that doesn’t always come down to technical legal knowledge. This is especially the case when the legal knowledge will be taught through law school and through the training contract itself.

They really just want to see you have analytical ability and an interest in the topic - not that you can get things right, but that you have the tools to make the right decisions in the future under their guidance.

I’d say 90% of interviewees have these thoughts on some level prior to an interview. Those that don’t have the potential to be over confident or ultimately probably don’t care enough.

People do freeze in interviews but rarely embarrass themselves when they do. If you do freeze, here are some tactics to use:

- Ask for a moment to think about the question and what your answer will be

- Ask them to repeat the question again

- Take a sip of water

- Ask the interviewer for more context (if appropriate)

- Ask if you could come back to that question later on in the interview

Always try and give the answer a go, but it isn’t the end of the world if you explain you are not sure of the answer but based on your understanding you think this is the right answer. Interviewers tend to guide you a little when you are off track.

And even if you do really freeze and can’t answer one question - it is just one question of many you will be asked. Your interviewer might be able to get what they are looking for from other questions they ask you.
Thank you for your kind words, I will try my best to keep all this in mind!
 

AvniD

Legendary Member
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Future Trainee
TCLA Moderator
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Oct 25, 2021
660
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Hi folks,
I wonder if anyone could help reassure me. I have my first ever in-person interview for a TC tomorrow. Whilst I feel the most prepared I've ever been for an interview, I still feel like there is so much I just don't know! I keep panicking that I need to read up on this and that but also think that if I don't know it now, then I won't in time for tomorrow. As someone with no prior legal work experience and a non-law student, I suppose I feel as though I'm not knowledgeable enough to be there. I also worry that I'll get a question I just can't answer, and that I'll freeze and embarrass myself.
Has anyone ever felt the same way?
All the best and many thanks,
G
First off, congratulations for your interview! This is incredible and you should be so proud of yourself 👏👏👏

I don't think @Jessica Booker could have said it better- her advice is absolutely spot on.

The only thing I would like to recommend you to do is step away from the interview and your thoughts about it for a bit. It is going to be hard but there are many ways to do this- chat with a friend/family member, go out for a walk or do a workout, engage in a hobby you like (for me, I painted throughout the application process to maintain my calm 😅)- anything, really.

The reason I'm suggesting this is because it will help you get a big picture view of the interview, which is that no matter the outcome, getting so far in the application process is an achievement that is really big on its own. It is also normal to be nervous- this is an unfamiliar, high-pressure situation for you and your interviewers are aware of this.

Instead of thinking that you need to be perfect or correct every single time you're asked a question, you could try to shift your focus towards trying your best with the resources you have at any given time in the interview. Being enthusiastic, present and understanding that making mistakes is not only expected but acceptable (to a certain extent) will help you calm your nerves. Know that you are not supposed to know everything going into an interview and the whole point is to recover from any mistakes you make, move on swiftly and engage yourself 100% in the tasks that you are assigned.

Wishing you the very best- you have got this! 💪
 

YJyj

Well-Known Member
Dec 29, 2020
21
15
Hi,

I have a question regarding the LPC. I have a training contract offer commencing in 2023, and just noticed in the paperwork that the firm does the normal, 9-month LPC instead of the 6-month accelerated course. I didn't know this was the case and would strongly prefer to do the accelerated LPC course. The document says the firm "expects you" to study the normal LPC.

Is there anything I can do about this? Is it an obligation to do the longer course, or just a preference? And is there any way I might be able to keep my offer while doing the accelerated course, like most big firms?

Thank you
 

Abii

Legendary Member
Junior Lawyer
Feb 1, 2021
245
714
Hi,

I have a question regarding the LPC. I have a training contract offer commencing in 2023, and just noticed in the paperwork that the firm does the normal, 9-month LPC instead of the 6-month accelerated course. I didn't know this was the case and would strongly prefer to do the accelerated LPC course. The document says the firm "expects you" to study the normal LPC.

Is there anything I can do about this? Is it an obligation to do the longer course, or just a preference? And is there any way I might be able to keep my offer while doing the accelerated course, like most big firms?

Thank you
I think this would have to be a conversation you have with the firm, they may want you to do the 9 month LPC so you are in a class with the rest of your cohort.

Are there strong reasons you want to do the accelerated course as opposed to just a preference, as that may persuade the firm to allow you to do it differently.

Ultimately you wont know the answer until you have that conversation with the firm.
 
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George Maxwell

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Junior Lawyer 50
Oct 25, 2021
552
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Hi,

I have a question regarding the LPC. I have a training contract offer commencing in 2023, and just noticed in the paperwork that the firm does the normal, 9-month LPC instead of the 6-month accelerated course. I didn't know this was the case and would strongly prefer to do the accelerated LPC course. The document says the firm "expects you" to study the normal LPC.

Is there anything I can do about this? Is it an obligation to do the longer course, or just a preference? And is there any way I might be able to keep my offer while doing the accelerated course, like most big firms?

Thank you

I think this would have to be a conversation you have with the firm, they may want you to do the 9 month LPC so you are in a class with the rest of your cohort.

Are there strong reasons you want to do the accelerated course as opposed to just a preference, as that may persuade the firm to allow you to do it differently.

Ultimately you wont know the answer until you have that conversation with the firm.
Hi @YJyj,

I agree with @Abii here. I would have a conversation with the firm. My concern is that it might tie in with their cohort start dates. If you were to do the accelerated LPC when the rest of your cohort did the normal route, you may not be able to start earlier anyway. Of course you would be able to work in the meantime, but I do not think that the firm would allow you to start earlier by virtue of you taking the accelerated LPC.

Great advice @Abii! 🚀
 

AvniD

Legendary Member
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Future Trainee
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Oct 25, 2021
660
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Hello, guys. Hope you all are doing well. Could anyone please send me a link to Linklaters' global strategy or their latest annual report? I have tried looking for these documents everywhere but I haven't been able to find them.

Thanks.

Is this what you're looking for?
 

futuretraineesolicitor

Legendary Member
Forum Winner
Dec 14, 2019
748
280

Is this what you're looking for?
Thank you so much, Avni. Unfortunately, this isn't what I was looking for. This link just tracks the legal highlights of the year in different jurisdictions that Links does business in. I am looking for a document that includes things like the vision of the firm, how much money each practice area made, what are they planning for the future etc. Not sure if that document is called an annual letter or something else.
 

Jessica Booker

Legendary Member
Graduate Recruitment
Premium Member
Forum Team
Aug 1, 2019
9,475
14,137
Thank you so much, Avni. Unfortunately, this isn't what I was looking for. This link just tracks the legal highlights of the year in different jurisdictions that Links does business in. I am looking for a document that includes things like the vision of the firm, how much money each practice area made, what are they planning for the future etc. Not sure if that document is called an annual letter or something else.
I think many firms have stopped publishing full annual reports of late.
 

Jessica Booker

Legendary Member
Graduate Recruitment
Premium Member
Forum Team
Aug 1, 2019
9,475
14,137
Thanks for your reply, Jessica. Could you please tell me where else I can read about these things then? I guess the vision etc. should be available on the internet but unfortunately, I am not able to find it.

Thanks.
Anything like that will be on the firm’s website, typically under a “about us” section.
 

lawstudent12345

Distinguished Member
Feb 16, 2021
72
84
To all trainee solicitors and qualified lawyers! I'm trying to develop a better understanding of the legal profession from the practitioner's perspective, not student's, so I would like to know what services you use! Obviously many professional news sites (The Lawyer, law.com) are extremely expensive and just not feasible for students. Do you guys know of any resources (that are targeted at actual lawyers, not students) that are cheaper or free? Or do you think the resources on the premium section of TCLA (Latest news in the legal profession) are enough?
 

AvniD

Legendary Member
Staff member
Future Trainee
TCLA Moderator
Gold Member
Premium Member
Oct 25, 2021
660
1,437
To all trainee solicitors and qualified lawyers! I'm trying to develop a better understanding of the legal profession from the practitioner's perspective, not student's, so I would like to know what services you use! Obviously many professional news sites (The Lawyer, law.com) are extremely expensive and just not feasible for students. Do you guys know of any resources (that are targeted at actual lawyers, not students) that are cheaper or free? Or do you think the resources on the premium section of TCLA (Latest news in the legal profession) are enough?
If you're a student, I would recommend you to try and get subscriptions to the FT and The Lawyer through your university. If that's not possible, pivot to podcasts (Bloomberg Law, FT News Briefing) and business news sections in free newspapers. Try searching Youtube for some practitioner-focused podcasts or videos too. I hope this helps?
 

AvniD

Legendary Member
Staff member
Future Trainee
TCLA Moderator
Gold Member
Premium Member
Oct 25, 2021
660
1,437
Thank you so much, Avni. Unfortunately, this isn't what I was looking for. This link just tracks the legal highlights of the year in different jurisdictions that Links does business in. I am looking for a document that includes things like the vision of the firm, how much money each practice area made, what are they planning for the future etc. Not sure if that document is called an annual letter or something else.
I don't think you'll find all this information in one place if the firm hasn't published an annual report. For the firm's vision, try their website and for their revenue stats try news sources like The Lawyer.
 

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