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yanerlim

Valued Member
Sep 4, 2018
113
172
Hello everyone, I am recently starting to prepare for my WG Test after submitting a few applications. I have come to discover a few things about the test. Here's a bit of background for the test:
- It consists of (i)Arguments Section (ii)Assumptions Section (iii)Deductions Section (iv) Inferences Section (v)Interpretations Section

- Arguments -- Identify what is a strong argument and a weak argument. My tip for this is to read the question that is presented in front of you, and understand what is the objective of this sentence. Then read the argument a few times. Is it trivial, irrelevant and state mere facts instead of an advantage/ disadvantage? Then it is weak. Does it answer the question directly and present a good perspective on the advantage/disadvantage of the question> Then it is a stong one.

- Assumptions -- Identify whether an assumption is made or not. I cannot emphasise enough the importance of reading both the question and assumption. Sure certain "assumptions" that were presented LOOKS like it could make sense in the argument presented to you, but was it actually mentioned or could be assumed from the question? It is so important to not jump to conclusions and treat the question/ assumption as a blank slate.

- Deductions -- This is similar to Assumptions but applied to conclusions.

- Inference -- Identify which statement if True, Probably true, more information required, probably false and false. In my opinion, this is the trickiest of them all because it requires very close readings and understanding the nuances of what is true or probably true. Here is a way to identify and categorise those five elements: true = its is a fact on the passage, and true beyond reasonable doubt; probably true = you can infer it from the facts you have but it is not true beyond reasonable doubt; more information needed = this applies when the question poses an assumption and you need more information to verify these facts (ie: things are probably not written in the passage); probably false= based on the facts you have at hand, this is probably not possible; false= straight up LIES and contradicts the facts you have at hand. The way I approach this test is treating it like I am speaking to someone very sensitive or suspicious towards me whos waiting for me to slip up. You want to get all your facts right and not jump to conclusions and if it's false, you need to identify that it is not a fact.

- Interpretations-- I find this similar to Assumptions and Deductions because the essence of this test is to ensure you read everything accordingly and not jump to conclusions / make assumptions.

This may not reflect the actual WG Test as I have been doing practice tests on : https://www.assessmentday.co.uk/watson- glaser-critical-thinking.htm
However, having done a few WG tests before, this is the approach I would have taken.
Everyone have differen thought processes and ways to approach this test, if anyone has any tips/tricks, please share below!

I am interested in listening to 1. What is a strong/weak argument to you? and 2.How do you read and dissect a question to ensure a more effective and efficient way of responding to the questions?
 

Jaysen

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    This is great @yanerlim, thank you for sharing. I did try to get some Watson Glaser practice tests for TCLA at one point, but they aren't cheap!

    My advice for this and the verbal reasoning test would be to a) practice as much as you can so you get used to the style of questions; and b) use trial and error to determine which options must not be correct first. The test is far easier when you have narrowed the options down to two. As you mentioned @yanerlim, at this point, you should not make any assumptions or jump to any conclusions. For example, suppose you are down to two options: probably true and true. Only pick true if it is absolutely clear from the paragraph you have been given that the answer is true. If this is not the case, you should select probably true.
     

    Salma

    Legendary Member
    Feb 28, 2018
    650
    712
    This is great @yanerlim, thank you for sharing. I did try to get some Watson Glaser practice tests for TCLA at one point, but they aren't cheap!

    My advice for this and the verbal reasoning test would be to a) practice as much as you can so you get used to the style of questions; and b) use trial and error to determine which options must not be correct first. The test is far easier when you have narrowed the options down to two. As you mentioned @yanerlim, at this point, you should not make any assumptions or jump to any conclusions. For example, suppose you are down to two options: probably true and true. Only pick true if it is absolutely clear from the paragraph you have been given that the answer is true. If this is not the case, you should select probably true.

    I agree Jaysen.

    Also, just wanna add jobtestprep is so helpful with this!
     
    Hello everyone, I am recently starting to prepare for my WG Test after submitting a few applications. I have come to discover a few things about the test. Here's a bit of background for the test:
    - It consists of (i)Arguments Section (ii)Assumptions Section (iii)Deductions Section (iv) Inferences Section (v)Interpretations Section

    - Arguments -- Identify what is a strong argument and a weak argument. My tip for this is to read the question that is presented in front of you, and understand what is the objective of this sentence. Then read the argument a few times. Is it trivial, irrelevant and state mere facts instead of an advantage/ disadvantage? Then it is weak. Does it answer the question directly and present a good perspective on the advantage/disadvantage of the question> Then it is a stong one.

    - Assumptions -- Identify whether an assumption is made or not. I cannot emphasise enough the importance of reading both the question and assumption. Sure certain "assumptions" that were presented LOOKS like it could make sense in the argument presented to you, but was it actually mentioned or could be assumed from the question? It is so important to not jump to conclusions and treat the question/ assumption as a blank slate.

    - Deductions -- This is similar to Assumptions but applied to conclusions.

    - Inference -- Identify which statement if True, Probably true, more information required, probably false and false. In my opinion, this is the trickiest of them all because it requires very close readings and understanding the nuances of what is true or probably true. Here is a way to identify and categorise those five elements: true = its is a fact on the passage, and true beyond reasonable doubt; probably true = you can infer it from the facts you have but it is not true beyond reasonable doubt; more information needed = this applies when the question poses an assumption and you need more information to verify these facts (ie: things are probably not written in the passage); probably false= based on the facts you have at hand, this is probably not possible; false= straight up LIES and contradicts the facts you have at hand. The way I approach this test is treating it like I am speaking to someone very sensitive or suspicious towards me whos waiting for me to slip up. You want to get all your facts right and not jump to conclusions and if it's false, you need to identify that it is not a fact.

    - Interpretations-- I find this similar to Assumptions and Deductions because the essence of this test is to ensure you read everything accordingly and not jump to conclusions / make assumptions.

    This may not reflect the actual WG Test as I have been doing practice tests on : https://www.assessmentday.co.uk/watson- glaser-critical-thinking.htm
    However, having done a few WG tests before, this is the approach I would have taken.
    Everyone have differen thought processes and ways to approach this test, if anyone has any tips/tricks, please share below!

    I am interested in listening to 1. What is a strong/weak argument to you? and 2.How do you read and dissect a question to ensure a more effective and efficient way of responding to the questions?

    Amazing advice! I am anticipating doing my first soon. How is the time pressure in these tests? Do you have time to think through each question or is it pretty intense?
     

    Salma

    Legendary Member
    Feb 28, 2018
    650
    712
    Amazing advice! I am anticipating doing my first soon. How is the time pressure in these tests? Do you have time to think through each question or is it pretty intense?

    Hi Christy,

    The tests are very intense (I found them intense not to sure if others can relate). However, if you have practiced enough, they should be a breeze when it comes to the real thing.

    Good luck!
     
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    kaveesha

    Star Member
    TCLA Writer
    Mar 22, 2018
    41
    36
    Amazing advice! I am anticipating doing my first soon. How is the time pressure in these tests? Do you have time to think through each question or is it pretty intense?

    From my experience, the first time I answered the questions, I did take a little longer than I'd liked because the answers aren't always clear and it's often quite close with another option. But the test questions are recycled quite a lot so if you apply to multiple firms you normally get the same questions and that saves on time.
     

    Salma

    Legendary Member
    Feb 28, 2018
    650
    712
    From my experience, the first time I answered the questions, I did take a little longer than I'd liked because the answers aren't always clear and it's often quite close with another option. But the test questions are recycled quite a lot so if you apply to multiple firms you normally get the same questions and that saves on time.

    100% true!

    99.9% of the time every firm uses the same questions again. I was relieved at times haha
     
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    Jaysen

    Founder, TCLA
    Staff member
    TCLA Moderator
    Gold Member
    Premium Member
    M&A Bootcamp
  • Feb 17, 2018
    4,495
    8,067
    Amazing advice! I am anticipating doing my first soon. How is the time pressure in these tests? Do you have time to think through each question or is it pretty intense?

    Agreed with Selma. That's one of the biggest reasons you should practice a lot first. Take the time to get used to the style of questions so that you can be quicker on the real thing.
     

    Jaysen

    Founder, TCLA
    Staff member
    TCLA Moderator
    Gold Member
    Premium Member
    M&A Bootcamp
  • Feb 17, 2018
    4,495
    8,067
    From my experience, the first time I answered the questions, I did take a little longer than I'd liked because the answers aren't always clear and it's often quite close with another option. But the test questions are recycled quite a lot so if you apply to multiple firms you normally get the same questions and that saves on time.

    I used to get so happy when the same question popped up again in a different test!
     

    Salma

    Legendary Member
    Feb 28, 2018
    650
    712
    Fingers crossed! I mean, I'm not sure you can give me an answer, but how long are we talking time-wise per question!?!

    The whole test is timed for 45/30mins, (if I remember correctly) and there are 40 questions.

    I divide my time so I can tackle the harder sections (which usually take me a while to get my head around) of the WGT for a longer period of time compared to the easier-ish sections.

    Everyone is different, once you go through the type of questions/sections you’ll be dealing with whilst practicing, you’ll know what I mean!
     

    Nicole

    Legendary Member
    TCLA Moderator
    Feb 28, 2018
    233
    224
    On the above point, is it true that firms factor the exact time you spend completing the WGT aswell?

    Has anyone else heard of this or am I mistaken?

    I had heard this too, although Sandrou may be right that it's more for the other tests.

    I was under the impression that firms factor in your time when ranking your percentile. I think a lot of people don't finish.
     
    The whole test is timed for 45/30mins, (if I remember correctly) and there are 40 questions.

    I divide my time so I can tackle the harder sections (which usually take me a while to get my head around) of the WGT for a longer period of time compared to the easier-ish sections.

    Everyone is different, once you go through the type of questions/sections you’ll be dealing with whilst practicing, you’ll know what I mean!

    I have started! I see what you mean, I need to work out the questions I struggle most with, so I can divide my time effectively. Thank you.
     

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